It may not be possible to travel backward in time, but perhaps one day, we can bring the past to us.

Here’s a moment from my past: December 20th, 1975. A snowy day in Ithaca, New York. A branchpoint on the road that brought me to this moment with you.

It was the day I met Carl Sagan.

Reminds me of those ghost stars in the sky. You know, the ones that still shine their light upon us long after they’re gone.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Episode 5: A Sky Full Of Ghosts, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

(via jiruchan)

adamsbananas:

before watching cosmos: 

image

after watching cosmos:

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the-wolf-and-moon:

Science is On The Frontier

the-wolf-and-moon:

Science is On The Frontier

What most people don’t know, that they should, is that practically every food you buy in a store for consumption by humans is genetically modified food. There are no wild seedless watermelons, there’s no wild cows, there’s no long-stem roses growing in the wild …

We have systematically genetically modified all the foods, the vegetables and animals, that we have eaten ever since we cultivated them. It’s called artificial selection. That’s how we genetically modify them. So now that we can do it in a lab, all of a sudden, you’re going to complain?

So we are creating and modifying the biology of the world to serve our needs. I don’t have a problem with that because we’ve been doing that for tens of thousands of years. So, chill out.

afro-dominicano:

Why are conservatives afraid of Neil deGrasse Tyson?

I really liked some of the points made in this article save for the Bill Maher’s comment, didn’t really need it. But the general point made about a scientifically literate public bringing a political fallout was spot on.

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has been the recipient of a seemingly bizarre political backlash — after the conservative magazine National Review penned a takedown cover story on the “Cosmos” host last week depicting him as a smug, intellectual bully.

The story struck many as odd given Tyson’s gentle, geeky presentation style. Comedian Bill Maher had Tyson on his HBO show over the weekend, trying to make sense of the backlash.

“You’re a scientist, and a black one, who’s smarter than [conservatives] are,” Maher quipped.

The line got laughs, but it’s worth remembering that Tyson served the George W. Bush administration as a member of the Commission on Moon, Mars and Beyond in 2004. Conservatives have no problem harnessing Tyson’s intellect.

No, the danger Tyson brings to the political structure, as he gains an increasingly large foothold in the popular culture, is the threat of an informed populace.

“When you’re scientifically literate, the world looks different to you,” Tyson wrote in 2011. “It’s a particular way of questioning what you see and hear. When empowered by this state of mind, objective realities matter. These are the truths of the world that exist outside of whatever your belief system tells you.”

That may not sound radical, but the promise of a large, nerdy, young voting block that subscribes to Tyson’s sentiment is a threat to the political status quo — certainly Republicans, but Democrats as well.

Imagine if millions of young Tyson fans stopped searching for facts to confirm their personal biases, or ceased prioritizing using their education to leverage personal wealth, and instead sought the most sound solutions to identifiable problems for the betterment of the species. If the rising generation of young voters actually starts demanding rational, evidence-guided leadership, few in our current crop of elected officials would survive the political fallout.

Consider this: In 1995, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment — a nonpartisan panel of scientists and researchers assembled to offer objective technical guidance to Congress on scientifically complex issues — was stripped of all funding, effectively shutting it down. (Officially, it still exists on paper.) It has remained unfunded ever since. (Thanks, Newt Gingrich.) An attempt in May to provide a paltry $2.5 million to the office was stymied by House Republicans.

In a world where advanced technology has infiltrated nearly every corner of our lives — raising a litany of technical, ethical and legal challenges — our government is willfully scientifically illiterate.

The reason this status quo has been allowed to persist is that the general population isn’t much better. Conservatives continue to fight any attempts to combat climate change, while many liberals are refusing to vaccinate their children over fears of a nonexistent link to autism. It wouldn’t be hard to predict a liberal backlash against Tyson, similar to the one we’re seeing from conservatives, if he were to speak more prominently about his endorsement of genetically modified foods — one of the more scientifically unfounded banner arguments of the left.

Tyson is a threat to this cone of ignorance and self-interest. He’s a champion of knowledge and the human potential. He brings the fundamental belief that our species is destined for something greater than the interminable squabble between self-interested individuals and rival nations and dwindling resources — that our collective efforts can be applied to the pursuit of knowledge, ultimately paving the way for our exploration of the galaxy.

That’s a vision people can get behind. It’s also one that could potentially upend everything we know.

comedycentral:

Click here to watch some of The Colbert Report’s best guests, including Neil deGrasse Tyson.

redvsboohoo:

rooster teeth challenge
one quote

Houses come and go but a home is where you make your life. You can sell your houses but a home is where people love youDon’t forget that. x

(Source: explosm.net, via mollypopgirl)

broccoleafveins:

The Land Before Time (1988)

studyinstyle:

The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.

- Eleanor Roosevelt

(by x)

ohstarstuff:

NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON

Through science, we learn how incredible our story truly is. It’s a story that’s literally been written in the stars. It’s a story that is still unfolding. And it’s a story that every single one of us is a part of.

(Source: matrix-bearer)

stonedgorgon:

Star Trek Ongoing #13 - The Red Shirt Tales (Hendorff’s Story).

This has been one of my favorite stories from the series. For those that don’t recognize the name, you may recognize him as “Cupcake” from the 2009 Star Trek & Into Darkness movies.

irresistibile-grungievolezza:

Don’t judge nerds.

irresistibile-grungievolezza:

Don’t judge nerds.

starofbalance:

I have such feelings for the Legacy of Romulus Trailer